All posts tagged: Ethical treatment of older inmates

Tex Johnson, 67, sentenced to 50 year for stealing $24, is from Ron Levine’s multimedia project, “Prisoners of Age: Portraits of Elderly Inmates.” Photo credit: New America Media

Shattered Lives: The Ethical Treatment of the Aging Prison Population with Guest, Tina Maschi

    How do surviving crime victims consider the treatment of the one person who changed their lives forever, a criminal in prison? Whether the crime be homicide, assault, or violence of any type, the perpetrator has been convicted and sentenced to time behind bars. Where do we draw the line between punishment for the crime and the humane treatment of another? As more and more of the incarcerated become senior citizens in prison, the costs to house them rise as well, by approximately three times the expense of younger prisoners. Older prisoners become vulnerable and neglected, often faced with increased violence of fellow inmates, but there aren’t enough services addressing this unique situation, as well as the quandary of the ethical treatment of a fellow human being vs accountability for their crime. The other side of the dilemma is when elderly inmates are released there are often few resources available, families have dispersed, and they are faced with more uncertainty about their welfare than when they were in prison. Shattered Lives Radio listeners will hear …